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Winter care for strawberry plants in pot

Winter care for strawberry plants in pot


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Winter care for strawberry plants in pot

I recently bought several strawberry plants. I have had them for about 2 months. I keep them in potting soil, but I’m just not sure I know what I’m doing with them. I keep them in the basement where it is warm but not too hot. The potting soil is light colored. I only water when I feel them getting a bit dry or wilty.

Some day a week ago I put them out on a sunny day and they seemed to grow pretty well. However, since then I’ve noticed that they are turning brown and they appear to be starting to droop. I don’t want them to die, because I’ve heard that planting strawberries in June can yield good fruit. I guess they just need more exposure to sun, but what do I do?

Thank you for your time and any advice you can provide is appreciated.

ANSWER:

It sounds like the potting soil you used is light colored in which case it will get a lot of light. Since they have been in this pot for awhile and no longer have the sun on them, the plants are probably getting too little light. They may be suffering from sunburn, too. If that is the case, the solution is to repot them and take them back into the sun again.

As far as the plant looking droopy, the only thing I can think of is that the soil is very wet in the pot and the roots are not getting enough oxygen.

Also, it seems that the soil is not rich in soil nutrients, so they need more fertilization. I suggest getting your soil tested and fertilizing the soil with a compost and fertilizer. I would also add some extra nutrients to the soil you use, because they are already light colored in color, so they won’t absorb much of the fertilizer.

Good luck with your plant, and please let us know how you do.

QUESTION:

I have a bonsai tree… what are the most common root issues, and what can I do to fix them?

My tree is about 14″ tall now, and has been in a pot for about 10 months. The soil is in the pot is “garden” soil. I’m wondering if any thing I can do to promote better root growth? I have a “pot” ready to plant the tree in, and was going to plant the roots through the holes in the bottom of the pot. Will this work? My neighbor has a big tree that looks great. I don’t know the variety.

Thank you,

Debby

ANSWER:

There are different types of roots on a tree. The roots you are talking about are lateral roots, which are the short side branches that grow out from the main root. Lateral roots serve two important functions: to provide nutrition to the tree and to give a plant stability.

When your tree is in a large pot the roots have less access to the necessary nutrients to keep the tree healthy. This can lead to root rot and other problems. As long as the tree is in the pot long enough to provide the necessary time, you can remove the roots and plant them in a hole in the ground. The hole needs to be large enough to allow the tree to settle into the soil. You can start the roots growing again in your new, well-watered soil.

If the tree is larger and planted in the ground, use a soil mix with plenty of peat moss. The peat moss helps to hold the soil together. It also promotes good drainage. There are many good soil mixes available. I like “The Soil Mix for Trees &, Shrubs.” Just keep the planting holes large.

A new tree needs a new place in the ground. So don’t plant the tree in the same place every year. Move it to a new, large hole every spring to give the roots room to grow.

The best type of tree pot is a soilless mix that contains only peat moss and vermiculite. Avoid plastic pots as they can retain moisture which is unhealthy for trees.

There is no need to fertilize a newly planted tree in the fall.

Have your tree root-bound? You might need to “root-bound” a tree, which means to tie up the roots to force them into a more desired shape. You can also tie the root ball to a fence stake. The fence stake provides a good anchor for the tree.

When you plant a tree or shrub, you want to be sure that the top of the root ball is above the soil surface. This is easy to do. Cut the tree or shrub to a size you want and add a new pot to the tree or shrub. Cover the pot with sand or other potting mix. Fill the pot to the top. Water the tree or shrub so the roots get to go deep into the sand. Then plant the tree or shrub into the pot. This method is good for small trees or shrubs.

When you plant a tree or shrub, plant your tree or shrub on a day when it is not windy. Plant the tree on a windy day, and it may be difficult to get the pot containing the tree or shrub into the hole.

After the tree is planted in the ground, water the tree well with an appropriate amount of water. It helps the tree to grow.

About the Author:

Weed-free gardens are a necessity for today's families. This handy guide is a great resource for new gardeners.



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